The Story of the Modern-Day Samaritan

One widely-used quotation spread around the internet comes from Dr. Milton Diamond:

“nature loves diversity, society hates it”

I don’t think it’s as much society that hates diversity as the media, although the two do kind of go hand-in-hand.

You probably get the picture by now that I get a little worked up by people who feel it is their business to discriminate against others simply because they are different. It’s one of the main reasons why I don’t read any print media – without even touching a copy of one of the British Tabloid newspapers, I can see how they persistently poison us against “the enemy” – whether that be migrants, gay people, transgender people – anyone who is not “normal”; in other words, anyone who doesn’t conform to the profile of the majority.

Reality paints a rather different picture. Despite the publicity given to views not unlike those of ultra-conservative groups like Britain First or Westboro Baptist Church, their views are by no means mainstream. The UK’s more extreme political parties have no real power, and any open protests against such minority groups rarely come without a much larger counter-protest.

Britain First are, on the other hand, home to one of the biggest ironies in politics. In among their policies rallying against immigration and Islam (and the one ‘better support for the NHS’ policy that’s a complete no-brainer), you’ll find the one where they want to promote Christianity. I was a church-goer for several years, and studied the Bible in depth during that time, and I can honestly say that the Christian philosophy is almost diametrically-opposite to that of Britain First. I think the only reason Britain First actively promote Christianity is due to the widespread influence of Anglicanism and its historical origins in Britain.

I’d like to see how they explain away the parable of the Good Samaritan – a story of how the more “high-class” people in society neglected to help a man robbed and left at death’s door, yet it was the “low-class” Samaritan who stopped to help. It’s easily the strongest and most prolific anti-discrimination stories ever written.

Let’s put it in a modern context…


A man was walking down a quiet side-street on his way to work, when a gang of thugs grabbed him, threw him to the floor, kicked and stabbed him repeatedly. When they’d had their fun, they took his wallet, phone and anything else of value, and left the man bleeding to death on the street.

The first person to walk past was a Stockbroker. The man weakly turned his head to face the stockbroker and whispered “please help me”. Just then, the bell at the London Stock Exchange rang; the stockbroker simply replied “sorry – I’m needed somewhere else” and went on his way.

The second person to walk past was an MP. Again, the man turned to him and, in an agonised whisper, asked “please can you help me”. The MP asked him “where do you live?”; when the man told him, the MP replied “sorry, you’re not one of my constituents – I cannot help you” and walked off.

The third person to walk past was a clergyman. Surely a man of the cloth would help someone in need? Once again, the man turned and asked “please can you help me”. The clergyman looked at how beaten and bloodied the man was, and took pity. At that time, the bell at his church started ringing and the clergyman simply said “sorry – my congregation need me. You’ll be in my prayers!” before hurrying off.

The last person to walk past was a refugee from Syria. One last time, the man asked him if he could help. The Syrian didn’t understand English, but he could see how badly hurt he was. He called to his friend, and between them, they lifted the man up and carried him to the nearest hospital.

Outside the hospital, the junior doctors were calling another strike. The MP had been to see them just moments before to tell them about their new contracts, which would have them working longer hours for less pay. One of the doctors looked at the man and could see he was in immediate need of help. He threw down his placard and ushered the Syrians towards A&E where he would be waiting with his team. The junior doctor and his team cleaned and disinfected his wounds, and replaced the blood he lost. They took care of the fractures in his ribs and skull.

When the man was in a stable condition, they moved him on to the ward. A Polish nurse made sure all his dressings were clean, a Romanian lady from the kitchens brought him the food and drink he needed to regain his strength, and the Syrians who stopped to help him came to visit every day – the patient in the adjacent bed spoke fluent Arabic, and translated for them. The man expressed his eternal gratitude towards them for saving his life when nobody else would. A life-long friendship began that day.

Watching from a distance, a journalist witnessed the whole incident and wrote the whole story down. He told of how the Stockbroker, MP and Clergyman all passed him by. He told of how the Syrian refugees stopped to help him, and how the junior doctor abandoned his picket to help save that man’s life. When his story was complete, he went to see his editor. His editor read it, screwed it up into a ball, and threw it away. Shocked, the journalist asked “why did you just throw my story in the bin?!”. His editor swiveled his chair to face the journalist, put on a serious face and said…

“The owner of this newspaper netted a cool £20m thanks to that stockbroker, the MP is voting against further regulation of the press, and the vicar is a very respectable member of my country club. I can’t print anything that tarnishes their reputations.”

The journalist wasn’t impressed. “It’s never stopped you before. Go on… what’s the real reason?”. The editor returned a knowing smile and replied:

“We can’t have the plebs thinking refugees are good people. We don’t want to look like hypocrites, now do we?”

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